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the next year. we plan to have quarterly meetings and have them include educational component to help dwns the mutual knowledge and guide the work and continue to have robust exchanges among ourselves and the key agencies and cal-ema and fema and others providing resources post disaster so thank you. >> thank you very much. that was very informative. thank you. i would like to ask now john boseman to come join me who is the government affairs manager for boma and the mayor mentioned it early ye today. i think john has a one minute film he's going to show and he's also going to be -- as you know in each of the agenda's we ask a community partner to come up and do a brief presentation so we know what they're up to so john i turn it over to you. >> thank you. i appreciate it. happy friday afternoon. it's an honor to be here with so many distinguished city leaders. i am humbled and admiral thank you for your good work. it's an honor to be in the same room. who knows what this is? good. that sames me time. i'm here to talk about the importance of this room and building and the good wo
findings of a legislative committee study. >>> plus, a conversation with an education innovator, sal khan, on a mission to bring a free world class education to anyone, anywhere. >> it's really about the student taking ownership of their own learning. >> coming up next. >>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." big news today from the u.s. supreme court on gay marriage. before we get to our other topics, we'll briefly discuss that with our panelists. joining me tonight are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end.
a large time in cal fire on public education and prevention and also with respect to you were talking about fuel, the fuels program, or vegetation management program in cal fire, we have a robust program throughout the state where we are conducting burning operations and vegetation management with prieflt ranch owners and private land owners as well as on state and cooperating with our federal agencies with the u.s. forest service. so two-fold program, vegetation management, we aggressively pursue that, but also from a public education stand point. what we find in these large scale incidents, the public is going to have to be self-sustaining and self-supporting. they need to be prepared. we try to educate them in respect that we say we'll provide the offense, you provide the defense. we talk to them about hardening their structures in a defensive measure against wild land fires. a lot of it is public education, survivability, building standards, but predominately our focus is putting the onus on the land owner, putting the onus on the private property owner, we will attempt to pr
needed to build up a great community of people sharing cars. that lets us find great cars, educate the owners, educate the renters, and ensure there is the right balance and variety of cars. if you look on the site in san francisco, you will literally see cars all over the place. it is all over the bay area. you are seeing cars sharing happening in places it never had before. we worked with the city to see if there were any ways we could get out the word. we hope to work with existing programs or be added as an additional transportation solution. in general, we like to involve the city and city leaders in our announcement of coming to market, and it has been working really well. >> i know you have community managers all over the globe. what's going on there? >> airbnb goes to network effects. we are all over in -- we are already in 19 cities all over the world. we just provide the tools on line, and local residents throughout the world decide they want to be part of the movement and part of airbnb and list their homes on the site, and local travelers decide they want to go somewhe
the graduation requirements that were established by the san francisco board of education. we, in san francisco, have seen tremendous economic growth coming out of the most severe recession since the great depression, and having served on regional bodies that include other jurisdictions, i can tell you that we are very lucky in san francisco, that we are lucky that we have the resources that we have had, and that we hopefully will continue to have. but, yetd yet, in a city as wealthy as san francisco we have a school district that is facing a crisis. we have about half of our students in this class of 2014 that may not be able to graduate and meet the requirements. san francisco has to do better than that. and even though money is not everything, the ability for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i wi
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
on the san francisco public utilities commission and for the education plans for the choice aggregation and cleanpower sf program. >> okay. very good. colleagues it's a really as president torres as said it's a momentous occasion, historic occasion we had. we improved our relationship with shell and the allocation for the cleanpower sf and we're looking how the power can be maximized in the next year as we in fact the process of enrollment. i've actually believe that the timing of this could not be anymore -- anymore important to do today because of our global climate change that is happening, and i believe that we're seeing -- actually on the way here today i was listening to the radio. there was a report on democracy now that a portion of our artic ice about the size of the united states of america had melted this year which is significant to really alter what the temperature of the ocean is and we're seeing what really the impact of -- every year we're seeing dramatic examples of climate change and hurricane sandy being one of them. we're also seeing around the world real demogr
that are younger and are energetic and they come from all over the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game.
by at least 26.5 million dollars a year, every single year. we would see over $5 million of cut to education, and almost $3 million of cuts from public housing. san francisco's allocation of medicare would be cut by $2 million. funding for the wic workforce program would lose almost $5 million. there would be a $1 million cut to housing services for people with hiv and aids and more than $1 million cut to the community development block grant program. ladies and gentlemen, this is our safety net. and our safety net's already strained by years of state cuts and it cannot sustain these additional reductions in federal funding. in addition to the cuts i have just detailed, there are also competitive grants and state pass-throughs that will also see cuts, and totals for which we really cannot estimate at this time. although this is serious business, and we need to get engaged -- although this is serious, we need to get engaged as a city to advocate against request ration -- sequestration taking place. my office is closely engaged with the governor, his white house, members of our federal delegat
of the indian education act. she has moved beyond the limits of her duties for the families in her district. she spends time volunteers for all community functions that the alliance puts on. the families that she serves remember her fondly and all that she did for them. she offered her talents to powwows, food booths, graduations and dinners and let's watch a video on gwen stirrer. >> i am [inaudible] known as the keepers of the western door. they're on the western side of new york and they're the biggest of the tribes. i'm the one -- i'm the one that creeks that runs through our reservation now. indian community -- there was nothing in the beginning. for 20 years that i work in the school district helping the children understand that their heritage was important, and important to be proud of being indian, and so that gave them reasons to study harder and to be a better student and stay in school. where you come from is important and what your background is and your family, so we have to have indian education. i don't think i'm a hero. i just had a job to do, and did it with the chi
-business and less red tape and access to capital. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right workers. it is best known for its ski resorts and quality of life. the real challenge we have been working on in turning this thing around is to say, how do we become the most pro-business state? california will be more pro- business. oregon will be more pro- business. how to create that competition to be the most pro-business state but to hold ourselves to higher standards. we want to be the best of being pro-business. that focus, trying to get the partisanship to -- our legislators and state voters are one-third independent, republican and democrat and our legislature is almost evenly divided. if we pass our budget last week with 94 of 100 boats. i think we have been successful and beginning to get past the partisanship. this time to quit playing games and finding compromises. >> other specific things you were trying to do to make colorado more business friendly? >> we have efforts in every single agency of state government to cut specific regulations and red tape.
. it is useful for us to be as relentlessly pro-business as we can. we're very focused on education and we want to be the no. 1 state for solving this riddle that this country has become from being the no. 1 public education nation to one in the bottom half. we know the things -- at risk kids are coming from difficult neighborhoods and often broken families, they need a longer school day. that is nothing new there. there's another way to do that without spending a bunch of money. you can get your teachers union to agree to stagger the school day. some teachers come in early and you have study hall, some come in later and you have sports after school. there is a bunch of ways to address education. great teachers more than parent involvement or anything, you put a great teacher in front of a kid, they work miracles. i think our goal is to say that we're going to fix education. we're working statewide to begin to implement. we do not want them filling out multiple choice tests but you have to measure the effectiveness of a teacher. our goal is sitting down with the union and having them at the tab
, our focus has been on educating the public on public policy. and fostering the future leaders from our minority communities to serve at federal, state, and local levels. the mission is to empower patients and pacific islander americans in civic and public affairs to education, active participation, and leadership development. >> civic engagement, leadership development, and community servthe theme of tonight's evens a celebration of the achievements and accomplishments of asian-americans in the state of california and our nation. >> ok'ing. -- ok. i would like to introduce our host for this evening. very well known as the first asian-american mayor in san francisco history. mayor lee championed balancing the budget to keep san francisco safe, solvents, and successful. he reformed city pensions. his focus is on economic development, job creation, and building san francisco's future. a great job, especially for helping out families. we want to keep families here. i also wanted to mention a little bit of his past. he was born in 1952 in the beacon hill neighborhood of seattle, washington.
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
. we're the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the work force, the 21st-century jobs. that is what we get from higher education to work force training, the real obstacle and the income growth right now is having the best education systems. where we are producing the workers of the 21st century. second, we keep the bridges open and hopefully functional and rebuilt. we represent environmental policies to keep our water clear and take on the environmental challenges that we're facing. it is where the rubber hits the road that we need to get the results. we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets understand that they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with a vision on education, on ensuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force for the jobs that aring with created, so we can be the job creators and we see incomes rise on our constituent. that is what voters judge you by. when we come out and talk to candidates we go for job creators, folks who are going to create jobs in this
don't have all the details of the early notification and education plan there, the framework is clear and i think it's a good starting point to move forward for the city and i believe that while we have had comments about talking about caution i think they're well meaning how to have a successful program but i think the success of the program is that we roll out quickly with the notification and the education plan. that's going to be most meaningful. i also want to make sure that we're really clear that the effort is really working in the deep green areas first and foremost where we know a particular target audience is for the message and we know how to craft that message for them as well. i think that is going to be significant. we're not reaching out to every population in san francisco from the get go but the deep green area is where we need to focus the efforts on. this plan incorporates that and i believe it's the right way to go. i would like to move forward approving something today that can later be implemented early next year and hopefully we can move that in that direct
a potential customer's attention long enough to explain the differences as well and to educate on those nuances of renewable energy credit versus bundleeled kilowatt hours and it's complex and i don't know how long they will colerate -- tolerate us on the porch talking but that is a key part and the education component in order to survey them and what they think is an important part of it, so we will be conducting our third city wide customer survey in early january to test this new premium price that we have established and as well as this and the pg&e green tariff option is available to them. we will use the results of the surveys then to redine the roll out of the program. it will help us make sure we anticipate the right number of -- right percentage of opt out across the city, and we will take that heat map i showed you with the green and that survey will modify the specifics of that heat map again because we will have better information once again about customer acceptance of the program and then that wraps up the first quarter and we will have enough information then to come to
thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
california is the 9th largest economy in the world and we educate one out of eight children in the united states. california currently ranks left in teacher to student ratio, we rank last in library to student to student ratio. over the last five years, 2007-08 the district has been cut by 146gjtgç million. this past year alone the state budget cuts were 77 million. for every student, the district should be receiving@gj5é $6697,0 $5204. the district has had to cut nine and a half school days to furlough days because of this. that's nine and a half less school days for us to teach reading, math, science, you name it. but yet we expect our students to graduate on time and to be just as successful as other students with"ej3w nine less instructional days. as a teacher i just want everyone to understand the pressure that you have in fulfilling your lesson plans when you have nine less days to teach the students the same amount of information that you're expected to. five years ago we were ranked 38 out of 50 in( jó the country anr people spending. today ?j x8ñ are ranked 47th. all of the s
a fire. we've worked hard to educate them, i think a lot of them get it now but it was a challenge initially. >> thank you. do you want to say anything? >> yeah, i wanted to comment on operatability within the california national guard. they worked really well within the framework that we established with cal fire and then beyond that throughout the national guard and the army, all of our aviators train to the same standards so really we're able to integrate any aircrew from any state, any component, into our program at any time because we're operating you noah cording you know, according to the same standards. back in 2008 we had a very large fire event here in california and we aircraft from 22 states responding to that. there is capability to respond within the national guard alone and we have started developing relationships with our title 10 partners, we do similar academics every year like they do so i think that helps generate interoperatability amongst the title 10 and title 32 assets within the state as well. >> well, i don't know about you all but i feel pretty comfor
. that is our promise, we have to keep that, we have to keep our education strong, we have to keep our economic foundation strong, we have to keep our opportunities strong. thank you. i am honored. let us celebrate. on behalf of the city and county of san francisco, i officially declare this to be asian pacific heritage month in san francisco and the state of california. welcome. [applause] >> i am going to make one correction. he said president obama is the first african-american president. president obama crew up in hawaii. -- grew up in hawaii. it makes him an honorary asian- american. he is the first asian-american president as well. tonight's events would not be possible without our community partners. a group that helped make all this happened, i am going to read them all. the asian business alliance, asian law alliance, the asian pacific american leadership institute, chinese-american cultural association, chinese american political association, citizens for better community, culture to culture, why in the chamber of commerce of northern care of -- kawai and chamber of commerce of northe
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
on the really important things that make a difference from job creation. we are the folks that run the education systems that allow us to have the workforce of 21st century jobs. that is what democratic governors get. the real obstacle to job growth is having the best education system, particularly in the s.t.e.m. sciences. we implement many of the environmental policies. where the rubber hits the road is that you have to get results. the reason we are winning races is that we have democratic governors who not only balance budgets and understand they have to be fiscally responsible but we combine that with an imaginative vision on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they hav
and learning environmental education. they are getting paid. it is work and helping to steward the land and learning leadership skills and i want to name a couple of folks from that program. kimberly who runs the vote tear programming and zoey and brenda from green acres. where is brenda? she's not here and carolyn from the port who we have worked incredibly close with. [applause] just to conclude there has been a lot of talk about team lately. chris bochy said it yesterday and the mayor said it yesterday and this morning. this is a team and great things happen when we work together and looking around the room there are so critical members of the team and putting our parks and rec and open space, the quality of life for san franciscans ahead of self and that includes the port. it includes department of public works. it includes public utilities commission and the local unions and the park alliance and friends at bicycle coalition and the rand off institute and center for environmental yesterday. there are so many incredible partners contributing to making this city better and it's
thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs. the stated purpose o
be able to have opportunities for college and higher education. african-american, latino and english-languageojsqy lerner advocates in pushing for this as an equitable and just measure. everyone else that has worked on this. >> president chiu: supervisor chu. supplemental value i wanted was correct. you're looking at 2.7 supplemental reducing it to 2 2.205. it looks like the source of funding you're suggesting is 4.412 from the schoolw5hhheÑ dit set aside funds and the balance from the state reserves? >> supervisor kim: that is correct. >> supervisor chu: the balance was more like -- >> supervisor kim: i thought it was 843,000. >> it probably should be 793,000? in front of us. have the balance come from the state reserve, correct? okay. so i wanted to clarify that, and glad that that was amended and changed. i know that young and other folks at the school district have been working hard with the mayor's office to work on that number and really trying to work that number down in a way that didn't jeopardize the credentialing program so i want to thank the school district
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
. i've always sped if you're going to spend dollars spend it on your kids education and i agree with that. i do have a question as well about the source of funding. in terms of rainy day funds not knowing before the school has anticipated budget surplus going into this year, pulling it from state reserves right now with a $15 million state reserve, i guess i would like to ask ms. howard, pulling it from state reserves, we have 15 million from state reserves right now budgeted, and we're going to take some money from that according to this amendment. question is, from your point of view, from the mayor's staff and from budget office, what are we anticipating for, you know, state cuts, that we haven't seen yet? if it's less than 15 million we should talk about it. if it's more than that then i don't understand why we're doing this. >> thanks, supervisor. kate howard, mayor's budget director. so you're correct, we have allocated $15 million this year for state budget impacts. we expect to go forward, and i think i've talked to many of you previously about a state supplemental in th
make sure young people can graduate, can get on to higher education, can get on the way to find a pathway into our growing economy, that right now is falling -- is causing them to fall behind. because we're not providing the kind of safety net or education program and our job placement programs that can really help bring them up. this is a choice we have today. i totally support it and i hope we can actually find the votes to have a veto proof majority in making this go forward. >> president chiu: supervisor >> supervisor olague: -- kim and her staff for all the work on this and i wanted to refer to an article that was in yesterday's paper, and it's kind of an odd title but it was black boy see bleak future at school. it stated one out of four african-american boys in california is convinced he will fail in school, driven in part by poverty and trauma according to results of a legislative inquiry. then they go on to say, the report's findings included broad summaries of how men and boys of color especially african-american and latino males fair in california. race matter. where
that road, there will be consequences. >>> so how far would you go for your child's education? the chaos as parents try to sign their kids up to a school. >> who knew what could you find at good will. the treasure one woman stumbled upon for $12. we have it coming up. ,,,,,,,, welcome se my lcret d you are?air.an your worst nightmare mr. box. since you foolishly brought back your bonus jack! i have copied your two pure beef patties, lettuce, melting cheese, pickles, and middle bun, plus fries and a drink for $4.49. and now you will tell me what is in your secret sauce!! uh, i think i know. "we all know," "pretty obvious." you couldn't tell me when i handed out the wiener-dog lasers!?! they raced to sign their chd up for a spot at a-j whitteg >>> oh, my god, seriously. >> yeah, seriously. parents stampeding to sign up their children for a spot at an elementary school in south carolina which is apparently popular. the district's only school with an engineering curriculum. the chaos sent one mother to the hospital after she fell. enrollment was on a first come first served basis. some pare
money that could have a direct impact on everything from education to public safety. >>> when we come back, it seems to be a mystery of the universe, which mobile phone service really is best? we'll show you your own personal best option. card hassles? introducing chase liquid. the reloadable card that's easy to activate and can be used right away. plus, you can load cash or checks at any chase depositfriendly atm and checks right from your smartphone. get rid of prepaid problems. get chase liquid. . >>> with most cell phone contracts lasting two years, many consumers want to make sure they get the carrier that delivers best quality for the lowest price. but no one service fits all. ktvu consumer editor tom vacar found a valuable free tool that custom tailors your mobile phone decision. >> reporter: who has the best mobile phone service? >> verizon. >> at&t. >> metro pcs. >> i think it's a toss up. >> we never tell anybody who is the best cell phone company for them. >> reporter: he can help because he is ceo of a company that measures and monitors mobile phone speed and quality
schools more competitive and at least one education watcher is hearing all of this and worrying about the costly fixes and wondering, if we are just compounding the problem. our guest is from the education action group much the longer you are in school the more you are inclined to remember what you learn, the smarter you get, the more competitive our kids get and on and on. >>guest: that seems good on its face but you have this notion that quantity is better than quality. what states need to look at is quality. the type of instructor, are they effective? ineffective? the trouble is, we have fought been able to determine that because we don't have a good evaluation system for teachers and unions are blocking that and protecting ineffective teachers. >> there is no guarantee that the districts that the effective teachers will teach more? >>guest: no, if you have ineffective teacher it doesn't matter how long your kid in there. what you need to focus is on teacher quality. what makes an effective teacher? that is what they should focus on. >>neil: leak you i travel a bit and around the w
achievements, i have to tell you that what really moves my heart is what you have done for education, for kids in new york city and around the world, the 30 countries you've been to, the school programs you have initiated especially as we do less and less music education in our schools. i want to thank you for that. >> thank you very much. it's a blessing. >> talk to me about this anniversary and the importance of a quarter century of jazz at music center at lincoln center. >> i think we've had the opportunity to work as a community and meet with people all over the world, really, for the purposes of using jazz and the arts to uplift people and bring them together. and the education programs have been so well received. we have about 12 of them that cover kids of all ages from our little infants to jazz in the schools, we're going to be in -- we'll do 120 performances in the new york city public schools alone and we have essentially ellington, a high school jazz band festival and jazz competition we've been doing for 18 years and it's really been a blessing for parents and kids, so pane of our
in that process. >> 18 reasons was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that
services, education and employment, provides these opportunities for homeless people. we are already seeing the benefit of their work with us and it was at the outreach of tiffany and bill clark and the director of education and employment who is out of town with work related to the chef's program and through that contact i think we made a great start working with zen dusk and particularly on the chef's program and it was a great day to be here and mentioned earlier and their collaboration too and for us in the chef's program and the training culinary program those community relationships are essential. it doesn't work if you don't have it. we have relationships with about 20 restaurants in the city and we have now the benefit of this community benefits agreement with zen dusk with catering. i just talked before i came over here three times i think so far and we look at that only as the beginning. we also had the pleasure of doing a little teleconferencing at zen dusk offices and their equipment is a little more state of the art than ours and we appreciated that and i think for u
's really up to you, as i understand it the way that sally reads is that educational institutions would no longer be permitted in had a district at all so you could not legalize that in future it would no longer be permitted @at all. at alall. there are other projects that haven't applied but in this particular case, they did apply. >> and so it's an open application, it's an open application at this point, yeah. and if i might just on the your previous point to clarify and 50 understand it right the difference between autopsies three and four are the two maps between these two maps, this one that shows a handful of buildings that are already listed and this one that shows the eligible building. >> that is the different between 34 and five and five is the third map and that is the difference between option three and option four because the only -- it involves the same properties and if i can get the overhead really quick and it involves the same properties and it's just that we know that the properties are eligible for state and national register listing the different in the autops
and education about our waterfront, about the environment, about the balance of nature, and in the urban setting and of course it not have happened on the theme i will talk about the rest of my administration which is the team work that has to happen. we have rec and part that administers the bond. we have the port with its staff and byron and susan reynolds and working with public works to open up this area with the private sector whether it's ledge or the park advocates or the green space or the blue green advocates and this is all connected when i was taught during my dpb days and we had people walk along the water way and experience the wonderful, wonderful initial resources that we had, so all of these investments. >> >> will bring a lot of great use of open space to this area and not to forget we have a little off lease dog run that is also added in here for our dog lovers which there are countless many in the city and having an area where the dogs can play with their guardians and having a natural place for this to happen. you see all of the elements happening here and i want to thank
housing. and we're really excited to be teamed up with osb and oewd on this venture to bring education about the importance of disabled access. and it's our aim to really make sure that all these small businesses are inclusive to all patrons with the space that has the accessible upgrades and this a-d-a compliance. thank you. (applause) >> and one of the most important parts of the program of investing neighborhoods is making sure we're listening to the needs of our neighborhood partners. and to speak to those issues, are some of the small businesses who know how important it is to make sure we're getting the word out and who want to make sure their neighbors, small business neighbors are supported. one of those people is angela tickler, the hardware store across the street who will speak to the importance of this program now. (applause) >> angela. >> good morning. i'm also the president of our local merchants association. and, so, we have done a lot of work with carmen and katie's help over the last few years trying to educate particularly our mono lingual merchants in the area how t
, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> we have been telling you about these two unlikely but powerful men who have teamed up to fight for same sex marriage in california. they say it is not a matter of being republican or democrat, and same sex marriage is simply an issue of civil rights. cnn's gloria borger tells us how the story of this political odd couple began. >> we now need to resolve this election. >> reporter: it was the historic case that decided the presidency and divided the nation. olson and boyce were the ones on the steps of the supreme court battling it out. that was then. this is now. on the streets of new york, they're talking anything but the law. >> it is called crazy heart, jeff bridges. >> i know, i know. i haven't seen that. i want to see that, though, and avatar. >> reporter: yethey have come a long way. let me play a game with you. great lawyer. >> ted. >> david. >> reporter: that's too
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